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about

why did we name it ravenburn?

With our name we want to give our students a way to remember something about God when the going gets tough: if you are close to God, doing what you see he has called you to do, then he will provide for your needs in the way that he sees fit. 

Consider Elijah during the reign of King Ahab. After confronting the king about Israel's sin, Elijah flees into the wilderness. There, at Kerith Ravine, God feeds Elijah by using ravens to bring him food and by supplying a fresh brook for water. When God calls Elijah to move on, Elijah moves on, leaving the ravens and brook behind.

We want our students to remember that God will provide. Thus, our name. "Raven" is for the ravens, and "burn" is for the stream ("burn" is the Scottish name for a small brook, and in this way we also give a respectful nod to the Scottish Reformation). It's our way of pointing back to Elijah.

WHAT DOES OUR LOGO MEAN?
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Our logo depicts a person portaging toward the East. The canoe, which will come in handy as the river deepens, is at the ready but not in use yet.

 

A raven follows, showing that sometimes one must move forward without knowing where the resources for sustainability are. One keeps the eyes on the river, not the means of material sustenance. These follow by default.

OUR VERSE

Matthew 6: 19-34 (NIV)

 

“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.

“The eye is the lamp of the body. If your eyes are healthy, your whole body will be full of light. But if your eyes are unhealthy, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light within you is darkness, how great is that darkness!

“No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and money. “Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes? Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they? Can any one of you by worrying add a single hour to your life?

“And why do you worry about clothes? See how the flowers of the field grow. They do not labor or spin. Yet I tell you that not even Solomon in all his splendor was dressed like one of these. If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, will he not much more clothe you—you of little faith?

So do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the pagans run after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them. But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.